The ‘relentless emotional journey’ of the mothers of Central America’s disappeared

The New Yorker, May 2021. Film by Erin Semine Kökdil. The opening scene of the film “Desde Que Llegaste, Mi Corazón Dejó de Pertenecerme” (“Since You Arrived, My Heart Stopped Belonging to Me”) is shot through the windshield of a bus barrelling through fog, wipers swiping to no avail. We cannot discern what doom—or what... Continue Reading →

The grim compassion of searching for missing migrants in the desert

The New Yorker, April 2021. Film by Kristy Guevara-Flanagan and Maite Zubiaurre. On a recent Thursday afternoon, Marisela and Ely Ortiz, a middle-aged couple, went to a Costco in Temecula, California, to buy crates of bread and bottled water, a weekend’s worth of nourishment for twenty-five volunteers who would spend two days walking in extreme... Continue Reading →

The Rise of the Net Center: Anti-corruption efforts in Guatemala vs. an army of trolls

The Intercept, April 2018. With Cora Currier. En Español aquí. At 6:02 A.M. on August 27, 2017, the president of Guatemala, Jimmy Morales, uploaded a video statement to Twitter declaring the former Colombian judge Iván Velásquez a persona non grata and ordering his expulsion from the country. Velásquez is investigating corruption on behalf of a United Nations-backed commission... Continue Reading →

Central America’s Hip-Hop Guerreras

The Establishment, April 2016. In the U.S. media, Central America and Mexico mostly appear as places overpowered by corruption and skyrocketing murder rates. Violence is a defining characteristic of life here, especially for young people—but so is creativity, and art.  The Establishment recently caught up with two hip-hop artists who use music to engage in a public... Continue Reading →

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